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02 August 2005 @ 08:03 pm
a pilgrim's progress  
i just finished reading the children's abridged version of a pilgrim's progress (from this world to that which is to come). i also just fell in love with it. it's very like (the chronicles of) narnia, only much more allegorical, easier to understand, faster to grasp, and that probably only because i was reading the adapted version for children. and the book i was reading from was very beautifully illustrated; i really, really loved it. really. this is gonna be another one of those books my kids are simply gonna hafta read.

but why is it always so simple for them? for peter, susan, edmund and lucy in narnia; for christian and hopeful on their journey to the celestial city? the lines between good and evil, right and wrong always more or less clearly drawn, the straight and narrow path seemingly not so difficult to keep on, not so difficult to make out at times, as compared to that of real life? we speed through an entire lifetime of trials and tribulations with them within a short hour of actual reading--they cross the final river of death to the celestial city of zion, the dwelling place of the Lord of the hill; we return to the real world where people don't have such easy characteristic names to decipher them by, no names of places to clue us in on whether or not we're headed the right way, and we trudge on, not knowing how much further we have ahead of us to our own promised golden city.

a couple of my favourite parts:
...there were two children sitting at a table. One sat patiently, while the other wriggled and squirmed and cried and banged his spoon, demanding to be fed. By and by, a hatch opened and a plate of food was set down in front of the wriggler. He wolfed it down in a few spoonfuls, jeering at the other child, who had nothing and only sat calmly watching. Soon the food was gone.

Then the hatch was opened and food was set down in front of the quiet child, who ate it. But however much he ate, his plate filled up again. And the food looked
so delicious, Christian would have liked to eat it himself!

'These children was Patience and Passion,' said the Curator. 'Passion wants happiness
now, at once, instantly. He gets it, too, but of course it doesn't last. Patience waits for true happiness - the lasting kind which is never used up.'
passion--something i think i know (for all entitled to locked entries, yeah, fine, i defnitely have that...). patience--so near yet so far. food--something i really, really find very, very hard to resist. hunger--the pangs of which i dread. but for the sake of everlasting good food and an eternal filled stomach, perhaps everything would indeed be worth the patience i hope like hell i'll find i possess.

Hopeful knew what he was thinking. She also knew that, without Christian, she would be too young and too afraid to hold out against the Giant Despair.
too young, too afraid--feelings (i'm afraid) i'm only too familiar with. hope--what keeps people going; what keeps them from despairing. is it not so much purpose rather than hope that keeps people on? okay, i've run outta words...... go read it yourself.



on to something else. a friend messaged me today saying he was really kinda interested in english and was considering an english minor so he was just asking me about the workload for lit and stuff. he's actually planning to take ph1101e too... something i took before. so fun to have somebody new to talk all that funny english/lit stuff to. and then i can finally rid myself of some useless notes from the past, haha!

oh, and last night i also finished robert cormier's we all fall down. it's a short teenage thriller. nice, the way most things were woven into the plot. but i don't like unhappy endings. after so much of narnia, pilgrim's progress and such, i don't feel complete until there's a sense of victory of good over evil. we all know, somehow, have it incorporated inside of ourselves, that that's the way things should be. good always triumphs over evil. in the next life, if not in this.

i like young people's fiction, and i read them (when i have time) to the extent of being ignorant to more adultish fiction, because, i really love the easy access to understanding those books, and because, i don't think i'll ever grow up. i don't think i can help it if they think i'm too young. the way i can't help being anxiety-prone. heehee. as usual, i'm happy as it is, as of now. :)
 
 
Mood: content
Music: xin shang xin tong bu tong -- daniel chan